Gaechinger Cantorey

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Andrea Jung

aj(at)karstenwitt.com

+49 30 214 594-232

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Concept

The Gaechinger Cantorey, with its new line-up and focus, is at the top of the list of German baroque ensembles. Kulturradio, rbb

Hans-Christoph Rademann, with his transformed and streamlined Gaechinger Cantorey, is currently one of the most skilled conductors of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century repertoire. Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Gerald Felber, 19/09/2019

Hans-Christoph Rademann has long been considered both an important champion of historical performance practice and the leading choir director of our time. During his studies, he founded the Dresden Chamber Choir, and for many years was chief conductor of the NDR Choir and the RIAS Chamber Choir. Shortly after taking on his role as director of the Stuttgart Bach Academy – which, under Helmuth Rilling, had been praised worldwide as an ambassador for the music of Bach – he created a new foundation for the academy’s ensembles. The restructured choir and newly founded baroque orchestra, featuring top musicians from all over Europe, were combined to form a unified period ensemble, the Gaechinger cantorey. Their "Stuttgart Bach Style" has already become a successful trademark. In March 2020 they have added an exceptionally successful recording of Handel's Messiah (accentus music) to their long list of critically acclaimed CD releases. Excerpts of this recording can be heard in the new video and podcast series "Barock@home", in which Rademann, in conversation with his chief dramaturge Henning Bey, provides a fascinating insight into Handel's oratorio, which gives the listener a fresh approach and new information about this well-known music. Concerts of the Messiah will take place in 21/22 at Elbphilharmonie Hamburg and at Théatre des Champs-Élysées in Paris and will continue with an international tour.

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